Start the week with climate change education and research

Education Day (16 November) at the 2017 UN climate change conference in Bonn (6 – 17 November 2017) sees the public launch of a Virtual Special Issue of the journal, Environmental Education Research, focused on climate change education research.

As a taster of the launch event and a stimulus for engaging with the papers in the Virtual Special Issue, Alan Reid has prepared a series of key questions about climate change education and research, hosted on https://tinyurl.com/ceer-vsi. Visit the link to read the Virtual Special Issue for free.

Running the gamut of why climate change education has emerged, where to look for critical analysis of practice, progress and new directions, and what research and researchers have to offer debates about capacity building, awareness, participation and action strategies discussed at COP23, the papers in the VSI and Alan’s questions are a timely and provocative call to reflection and action about climate change and education.

The launch at COP23 is led by Alan Reid (Editor) and Marcia McKenzie (Associate Editor) from the journal. Guest editors of the Virtual Special Issue, they are also editing a follow-on special collection of new research papers and analysis on climate change education, to be published in Environmental Education Research in 2018.

Join the conversation about the VSI and climate change education! Participate via:
facebook.com/eerjournal (link is external)
#COP23education
https://naaee.org/eepro/groups/climate-change-education

 

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Start the week with the research strand at the World Environmental Education Congress

This week sees the start of the World Environmental Education Congress in Vancouver.

The research strand is focused on “Perspectives, Challenges and Innovations in Research”, and is being coordinated by senior members of the editorial board, Alan Reid and Nicole Ardoin.

There’s a fine mix of paper sessions, roundtables, posters, a full day research symposium on Monday 11th, and 4 mini symposiums throughout the congress. Most of the sessions will take place in West Meeting Room 110, or close by. The schedule is available at: WEEC-2017-Program research strand events-final. [updated 9 September]

Please note this is subject to last minute changes, please check the Congress website for latest information.

We are delighted to also be supporting the first full day research symposium at WEEC. This is being convened by Alan Reid and Marcia McKenzie, as a joint initiative between the journal and the Sustainability and Education Policy Network, while there’s a reception invitation from SEPN for Saturday evening, Sept 10th in the download above – please note it is 2017 not 2016 on the invitation: you won’t be a year late! Registration is required for the full day symposium and the reception.

Access the pre-readings for the research symposium at http://weec2017.eco-learning.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/WEEC2017-research-symposium-pre-readings.pdf

Find out more about the journal and SEPN at their booths at the congress.

We look forward to supporting the research community at these events, and interacting with you within and around the sessions!

Safe travels!

Alan, Nicole and Marcia

Tips on Thursdays – know someone who needs a research award?

There aren’t many awards in this field, but NAAEE does have some, including an “Outstanding Contributions to Research in EE” category.
Find out more on how to nominate – and of course, eligibility criteria – at the Research and Evaluation group eePRO group (you may need to join eePRO to see this):
You can read about the award and past winners at:
… and may spot some notable gaps in that list – a spur to nominate perhaps? Deadline is tight – 4 August!
PS if this category doesn’t quite fit, there are others, and other award schemes out – use the comments area to share those?

Weekend viewing – from Anecdotes to Evidence

Find out about the “Anecdotes to Evidence: Demonstrating the power of environmental education” project, from eeWORKS, a project designed to deliver communication tools and strategies that EE professionals can use to bolster support and increase investments in EE, based on summaries and reviews of the research literature.

Read on at: https://naaee.org/our-work/programs/eeworks

Collective Impact on the Ground

Start the week by considering the collective impact of environmental education initiatives

In this new article published in the Stanford Social Innovation Review, the journal’s Associate Editor, Nicole Ardoin and colleagues explore “what might be possible if organisations worked together to increase the impact of environmental education”.

The article sketches the roles and challenges of ensuring a commitment to equity, a common agenda, shared measurement systems, mutually reinforcing activities, continuous communication, and a backbone support organization.

— You might also be wondering what this raises for environmental education research too (and not just in California). For starters, how to foster (or impede?) collaborative processes, and what kinds of collective impact are desired and desirable for whom, where and when – and of course, why …?

An in-depth look at an environmental education collaborative during the early stages of its collective impact process.

In early 2013, funders, environmental educators, and researchers crowded elbow-to-elbow around a 20-year-old redwood forest shelf fungus. On the 23rd-floor conference room of a San Francisco skyscraper, a skilled educator engaged the group in conversation around this object. Hushed tones filled the room, punctuated by the easy laughter and engaged questions one would expect from a collegial group.

Yet, the group hadn’t always looked this way. Just a year and a half earlier, members of the group sat stiffly in office chairs as they wrestled with an exciting, yet daunting, question: What might be possible if their organizations worked together to increase the impact of environmental education across the San Francisco and Monterey Bay regions?”

Read on at the link: Collective Impact on the Ground | Stanford Social Innovation Review

http://ow.ly/5LUx30bN9Xe

How to understand and manage the interactional effects of having so many SDGs and targets?

The International Council on Science (ICSU) has published a report illustrating how researchers are documenting, visualising and evaluating the interactions between various sustainable development goals and targets, a simple scale for which is reproduced below. 

The scale and report offer a series of timely reminders to those facing competing demands on their priorities, efforts and understanding across a range of fronts.

First, there’s the usual concern that having multiple and many goals isn’t automatically good (particularly if you need not just fingers but toes to cover them all).

Second, each and every goal can’t easily be pursued simultaneously as if they were somehow isolated from each other or had no spill-over effects.

Third, as the report highlights, paying attention to interactions is crucial. A simple starting point is whether strategies and targets reinforce or undermine each other on a pair-wise basis. But the bigger challenge is facing up to the likelihood of complex chains of effects across multiple goals, where follow-on questions include the degree of uncertainty associated with modelling and understanding these, if not how important each and every scenario for these are (17 goals, 169 targets = how many possible interactions?).

So while a few circles and scales can get the conversation started, expect the 2030 Agenda to require more sophisticated and rigorous debate on what is possible to represent and understand here, for the experts and the public taking on the Sustainable Development Goals. Don’t be surprised if that requires further and new forms of learning, deliberation and inquiry in civil society and government – something that wasn’t quite what the authors of SDG4 had in mind as its remit or horizon?

https://www.icsu.org/publications/a-guide-to-sdg-interactions-from-science-to-implementation