Energy literacy of vocational students in Taiwan

Energy literacy of vocational students in Taiwan

  • article in the current issue

Lung-Sheng Lee, Liang-Te Chang, Chih-Chien Lai, Yunn-Horng Guu & Kuen-Yi Lin

Pages: 855-873 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2015.1068276

Abstract

In this study, we administered a questionnaire to 1001 vocational high school students to ascertain their literacy with regard to energy saving and carbon-emissions reduction (ESCER) and to analyze whether their literacy was affected by their gender or academic major. The data analysis produced the following conclusions: (1) behaviors pertaining to ESCER among vocational high school students should be enhanced by promoting appropriate affect rather than solely by conveying knowledge; (2) female students displayed superior knowledge and affect regarding ESCER compared with male students; and (3) students majoring in agriculture performed better than other students in terms of knowledge, affect, and behavioral aspects related to ESCER. The execution and results of this study can serve as a reference for courses or education related to this topic targeting vocational high school students to promote literacy for ESCER, thereby increasing students’ effectiveness in related issues in Taiwan.

Keywords: affect, behavior, carbon saving, energy literacy, knowledge

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2015.1068276

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Energy literacy and agency of New Zealand children

Energy literacy and agency of New Zealand children

  • article in the current issue

I. Aguirre-Bielschowsky, R. Lawson, J. Stephenson & S. Todd

Pages: 832-854 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2015.1054267

Abstract

The development of energy literacy (knowledge, attitudes, and intended behaviour) and agency of New Zealand children (age 9–10) were investigated through thematic and exploratory statistical analyses of interviews (October 2011–April 2012) with 26 children, their parents and teachers, focus groups and photo elicitation. The children knew that electricity costs money and saw it as a finite resource. Half could name an energy source but few knew of any associated environmental issues. Most of the children had a positive attitude towards saving electricity, but did not intend to save energy to a further extent (low intended behaviour) and were not influencing their families to conserve energy (low agency). The children were learning about energy informally from a variety of sources, and acquired their attitudes mostly from talking to their parents. The results highlight the need for energy education for citizenship at school and conversations about energy both there and at home.

Keywords: energy literacy, children, electricity, energy knowledge, attitudes, agency

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2015.1054267

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Teaching sustainability in Norway, China and Ghana: challenges to the UN programme

Teaching sustainability in Norway, China and Ghana: challenges to the UN programme

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Nina Witoszek

Pages: 1-14 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2017.1307944

Abstract

The article compares how the UN-initiated education for sustainable development (ESD) has fared in three seemingly dissimilar countries: Norway, a wealthy, ‘post-materialist’ liberal democracy, Ghana, a developing democratic country, and China, a fast catching-up, centrally- steered economy. The study – based on an analysis of national ESD programmes, schoolbooks and qualitative interviews with teachers and students – discusses some of the pivotal reasons for the decline in ESD schooling in all three countries. It also explores surprising ‘archipelagos of pedagogical innovation’, as shown by one of the high schools in Ghana. Our conclusions are that, apart from specific, cultural and political contexts which influence ESD, students’ socio-environmental literacy in the examined countries has been affected by an ever more pervasive competitive and neoliberal mindset. Further, in all three cases, the agenda of ‘sustainable development’ suffers from a ‘narrative and mythical deficit’: a lack of a mobilizing story, the absence of which reduces the attractiveness of sustainability ideals and inhibits their empowering potential.

Keywords: Education for sustainability, comparative curriculum studies, modernity, environmental values

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2017.1307944

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Using action research to enhance learning on end-use energy demand: lessons from reflective practice

Using action research to enhance learning on end-use energy demand: lessons from reflective practice

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Saska Petrova, Miguel Torres Garcia & Stefan Bouzarovski

Pages: 812-831 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1144177

Abstract

This paper responds to the need for a greater integration of energy and environment themes in the higher education curriculum. We explore the practical implications of empowering students towards the implementation of individual action research projects focused on investigating and addressing insufficient or wasteful energy consumption among households and businesses. The paper scrutinizes a series of teaching and assessment activities within this domain, undertaken during 6 consecutive academic years – between 2008 and 2013 – within a third-level undergraduate course unit at the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom. Using questionnaire surveys, assessed projects and interviews with the students, we have found evidence to suggest that the action research projects contributed to the emergence of constructive alignment in the entire teaching process, while opening the space for informal action learning ‘sets’ leading to the generation of new problem-solving skills useful in the job market.

Keywords: energy, geography, action research, active learning, employability

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2016.1144177

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Weekend viewing – “eeLEARN is a series of online learning modules exploring the foundations of environmental education”

One of their video resources offers a range of perspectives on #enviroed from around the world.

Q. How would you introduce #enviroed to someone unfamiliar with its aims and scope?

Find out more about eeLEARN at https://naaee.org/eepro/learning/eelearn

Business as un-usual through dislocatory moments – change for sustainability and scope for subjectivity in classroom practice

Business as un-usual through dislocatory moments – change for sustainability and scope for subjectivity in classroom practice

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Pernilla Andersson Pages: 1-15 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2017.1320704

Abstract

This paper makes a contribution to the debate that has been described as a tension between instrumental and emancipatory educational objectives in environment and sustainability education. The contribution involves a methodological approach (introd-) using the concept ‘dislocatory moments’, to identify and analyse moments in classroom practice that address educational objectives relating to ‘change for sustainability’ and ‘thinking and acting independently’. A case of business education, when ‘sustainable development’ is integrated in a series of lessons, is used to exemplify the approach involving analysis of the emergence and closure of a dislocatory moment and the change of logics that occur. The illustrative case shows how room for subjectivity and change can be intertwined in educational practice. It is suggested that the methodological approach could be used in empirical research of classroom practice to further knowledge about the kind of situations that contribute to ‘business as un-usual’ without compromising emancipatory education ideals.

Keywords: Discourse analysis, dislocation, logics, subjectification, environment and sustainability education, classroom observations, Practical Epistemology Analysis

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2017.1320704

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The interactive effect of pro-environmental disciplinary concentration under cooperation versus competition contexts

The interactive effect of pro-environmental disciplinary concentration under cooperation versus competition contexts

  • article in the current issue

Esther Cuadrado, Carmen Tabernero, RocíoGarcía & BárbaraLuque

Pages: 797-811 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2015.1095860

Abstract

This research explores the relevance of cooperation and students’ environmental disciplinary concentration on decision-making with respect to environmental issues – specifically the use of water, a limited common-pool resource. For this purpose, 61 environmental sciences students and 46 educational sciences students played the role of farmers and made decisions about irrigating their fields in the simulation ‘Irrigania.’ Prior to the simulation exercise, participants were randomly assigned to an experimental condition (competition or cooperation). Results demonstrated that both a cooperation situation and students’ environmental disciplinary concentration are related to the use of more pro-environmental and less selfish irrigation strategies in the simulation. Moreover, high levels of cooperation were able to counteract the lack of students’ disciplinary concentration on environmental problems; inversely, high levels of disciplinary concentration on environmental problems were able to counteract the competitive situations. This study highlights the relevance of programs that provide learning of (1) cooperative contexts that may reinforce cooperative frameworks on which students could base their behaviors, and (2) broader disciplinary concentration related to environmental problems that could lead to students feeling powerful in respect of knowing how to act against those problems and, thus, behaving in less selfish ways, with positive implications for the planet.

Keywords: water, simulation, pro-environmental disciplinary concentration, competition/cooperation, interaction

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2015.1095860

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