Young children’s ideas about environment: perspectives from three early childhood educational settings

Young children’s ideas about environment: perspectives from three early childhood educational settings

  • article in the current issue

Lauren Madden & Jennifer Liang

Pages: 1055-1071 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1236185

Abstract

Many efforts have been made around the globe to advocate for and encourage environmental sustainability education (ESE). As many as 15 fields can serve as ‘currents’ on the greater field of environmental education, including environmental education and education for sustainability. We acknowledge that each is a separate and distinct field of inquiry, but choose not to limit our perspective to any one field or the other. Thus, we have elected to use the term ESE to refer to work that falls into any or all of these categories throughout this manuscript for learners of all ages. Yet, there is a dearth of information at the early childhood level, defined as toddlers through eight-year-olds. Our exploratory study focused on better describing young children’s understandings of ESE. Young children (ages three-eight) from three different suburban early childhood education settings (public school pre-kindergarten, church-based cooperative preschool, and private daycare center) participated in focus group interviews before and one week after a brief ESE learning activity. Findings revealed that children were able to describe nature in more sophisticated ways after the intervention than before, suggesting that learning in early childhood ESE is possible and fruitful.

Keywords: Early childhood, environmental education, conceptions

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2016.1236185

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Start the week with the current issue of the journal

Environmental Education Research, Volume 23, Issue 8, September 2017 is now available online on Taylor & Francis Online.

http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/ceer20/23/8

 

This new issue contains the following articles:

Young children’s ideas about environment: perspectives from three early childhood educational settings

Lauren Madden & Jennifer Liang

Pages: 1055-1071 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1236185

 

The effects of socio-scientific issue based inquiry learning on pupils’ representations of landscape

Sirpa Kärkkäinen, Tuula Keinonen, Jari Kukkonen, Seija Juntunen & Ilkka Ratinen

Pages: 1072-1087 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1177711

 

Greek primary school children’s representations of the urban environment as seen through their drawings

Dimitrios Stokas, Elena Strezou, George Malandrakis & Penelope Papadopoulou

Pages: 1088-1114 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1219316

 

Compelling evidence: an influence on middle school students’ accounts that may impact decision-making about socioscientific issues

Katherine Emery, Danielle Harlow, Ali Whitmer & Steven Gaines

Pages: 1115-1129 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1225673

 

An interdisciplinary approach to environmental and sustainability education: developing geography students’ understandings of sustainable development using poetry

Nicola Walshe

Pages: 1130-1149 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1221887

 

Young primary students making sense of text and illustrations about how refuse can become soil

Lisbeth Åberg-Bengtsson, Dennis Beach & Agneta Ljung-Djärf

Pages: 1150-1168 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2015.1118750

 

Urban park design + love for nature: Interventions for visitor experiences and social networking

Eli Typhina

Pages: 1169-1181 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1214863

 

Neoliberal and disciplinary environmentality and ‘sustainable seafood’ consumption: storying environmentally responsible action

Teresa Lloro-Bidart

Pages: 1182-1199 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2015.1105198

 

The impact of on-site educational outreach on recreational users’ perceptions of aquatic invasive species and their management

Ryan L. Sharp, Lisa B. Cleckner & Sarah DePillo

Pages: 1200-1210 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1174983

Environmental Education Research 23(7) now available

Start the week with the latest issue of the journal, 23(7), now available online at:

http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/ceer20/23/7

This new issue contains the following articles:

Greenhouse affect: the relationship between the sustainable design of schools and children’s environmental attitudes

Parisa Izadpanahi, Hisham Elkadi & Richard Tucker

Pages: 901-918 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2015.1072137

Eco-School in kindergartens: the effects, interpretation, and implementation of a pilot program

Jan Cincera, Roman Kroufek, Petra Simonova, Lenka Broukalova, Vaclav Broukal & Jan Skalík

Pages: 919-936 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2015.1076768

Connecting students to nature – how intensity of nature experience and student age influence the success of outdoor education programs

Tina Braun & Paul Dierkes

Pages: 937-949 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1214866

Establishing enabling conditions to develop critical thinking skills: a case of innovative curriculum design in Environmental Science

Dina Zoe Belluigi & Georgina Cundill

Pages: 950-971 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2015.1072802

ESD implementation at the school organisation level, part 1 – investigating the quality criteria guiding school leaders’ work at recognized ESD schools

Anna Mogren & Niklas Gericke

Pages: 972-992 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1226265

ESD implementation at the school organisation level, part 2 – investigating the transformative perspective in school leaders’ quality strategies at ESD schools

Anna Mogren & Niklas Gericke

Pages: 993-1014 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1226266

An ESD pathway to quality education in the Cyprus primary education context

Chrysanthi Kadji-Beltran, Nicoletta Christodoulou, Aravella Zachariou, Petra Lindemann-Matthies, Susan Barker & Costas Kadis

Pages: 1015-1031 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1249459

The philosophies, contents and pedagogies of environmental education programs in 10 Israeli elementary schools

Tali Tal & Einat Peled

Pages: 1032-1053 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1153047

Energy literacy of vocational students in Taiwan

Energy literacy of vocational students in Taiwan

  • article in the current issue

Lung-Sheng Lee, Liang-Te Chang, Chih-Chien Lai, Yunn-Horng Guu & Kuen-Yi Lin

Pages: 855-873 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2015.1068276

Abstract

In this study, we administered a questionnaire to 1001 vocational high school students to ascertain their literacy with regard to energy saving and carbon-emissions reduction (ESCER) and to analyze whether their literacy was affected by their gender or academic major. The data analysis produced the following conclusions: (1) behaviors pertaining to ESCER among vocational high school students should be enhanced by promoting appropriate affect rather than solely by conveying knowledge; (2) female students displayed superior knowledge and affect regarding ESCER compared with male students; and (3) students majoring in agriculture performed better than other students in terms of knowledge, affect, and behavioral aspects related to ESCER. The execution and results of this study can serve as a reference for courses or education related to this topic targeting vocational high school students to promote literacy for ESCER, thereby increasing students’ effectiveness in related issues in Taiwan.

Keywords: affect, behavior, carbon saving, energy literacy, knowledge

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2015.1068276

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Energy literacy and agency of New Zealand children

Energy literacy and agency of New Zealand children

  • article in the current issue

I. Aguirre-Bielschowsky, R. Lawson, J. Stephenson & S. Todd

Pages: 832-854 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2015.1054267

Abstract

The development of energy literacy (knowledge, attitudes, and intended behaviour) and agency of New Zealand children (age 9–10) were investigated through thematic and exploratory statistical analyses of interviews (October 2011–April 2012) with 26 children, their parents and teachers, focus groups and photo elicitation. The children knew that electricity costs money and saw it as a finite resource. Half could name an energy source but few knew of any associated environmental issues. Most of the children had a positive attitude towards saving electricity, but did not intend to save energy to a further extent (low intended behaviour) and were not influencing their families to conserve energy (low agency). The children were learning about energy informally from a variety of sources, and acquired their attitudes mostly from talking to their parents. The results highlight the need for energy education for citizenship at school and conversations about energy both there and at home.

Keywords: energy literacy, children, electricity, energy knowledge, attitudes, agency

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2015.1054267

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The interactive effect of pro-environmental disciplinary concentration under cooperation versus competition contexts

The interactive effect of pro-environmental disciplinary concentration under cooperation versus competition contexts

  • article in the current issue

Esther Cuadrado, Carmen Tabernero, RocíoGarcía & BárbaraLuque

Pages: 797-811 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2015.1095860

Abstract

This research explores the relevance of cooperation and students’ environmental disciplinary concentration on decision-making with respect to environmental issues – specifically the use of water, a limited common-pool resource. For this purpose, 61 environmental sciences students and 46 educational sciences students played the role of farmers and made decisions about irrigating their fields in the simulation ‘Irrigania.’ Prior to the simulation exercise, participants were randomly assigned to an experimental condition (competition or cooperation). Results demonstrated that both a cooperation situation and students’ environmental disciplinary concentration are related to the use of more pro-environmental and less selfish irrigation strategies in the simulation. Moreover, high levels of cooperation were able to counteract the lack of students’ disciplinary concentration on environmental problems; inversely, high levels of disciplinary concentration on environmental problems were able to counteract the competitive situations. This study highlights the relevance of programs that provide learning of (1) cooperative contexts that may reinforce cooperative frameworks on which students could base their behaviors, and (2) broader disciplinary concentration related to environmental problems that could lead to students feeling powerful in respect of knowing how to act against those problems and, thus, behaving in less selfish ways, with positive implications for the planet.

Keywords: water, simulation, pro-environmental disciplinary concentration, competition/cooperation, interaction

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2015.1095860

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Start the week with the current issue of the journal

Environmental Education Research, Volume 23, Issue 6, July 2017 is now available online on Taylor & Francis Online.

http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/ceer20/23/6

This new issue contains the following articles:

Education for sustainable agriculture: a typology of the role of teaching farms in achieving learning goals and objectives

Kelly Monaghan, Marilyn Swisher, Rosalie L. Koenig & Juan C. Rodriguez

Pages: 749-772 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2015.1091877

“Women and the environmental are together”: using Participatory Rural Appraisal to examine gendered tensions about the environment

Cassie F. Quigley, S. Megan Che, Stella Achieng & Sarah Liaram

Pages: 773-796 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1169511

The interactive effect of pro-environmental disciplinary concentration under cooperation versus competition contexts

Esther Cuadrado, Carmen Tabernero, Rocío García & Bárbara Luque

Pages: 797-811 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2015.1095860

Using action research to enhance learning on end-use energy demand: lessons from reflective practice

Saska Petrova, Miguel Torres Garcia & Stefan Bouzarovski

Pages: 812-831 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1144177

Energy literacy and agency of New Zealand children

I. Aguirre-Bielschowsky, R. Lawson, J. Stephenson & S. Todd

Pages: 832-854 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2015.1054267

Energy literacy of vocational students in Taiwan

Lung-Sheng Lee, Liang-Te Chang, Chih-Chien Lai, Yunn-Horng Guu & Kuen-Yi Lin

Pages: 855-873 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2015.1068276

Potential for knowledge in action? An analysis of Korean green energy related K3–12 curriculum and texts

Douglas R. Gress & Jungyeop Shin

Pages: 874-885 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1204987

Effects of locus of control on behavioral intention and learning performance of energy knowledge in game-based learning

Jie Chi Yang, Yi Lung Lin & Yi-Chun Liu

Pages: 886-899 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1214865