The impact of on-site educational outreach on recreational users’ perceptions of aquatic invasive species and their management

The impact of on-site educational outreach on recreational users’ perceptions of aquatic invasive species and their management

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Ryan L. Sharp, Lisa B. Cleckner & Sarah DePillo

Pages: 1200-1210 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1174983

Abstract

Aquatic invasive species (AIS) present a great challenge to ecosystems around the globe, and controlling AIS becomes increasingly difficult when the potential vectors are related to recreational activities. An approach combining education and outreach efforts to control AIS may be the best course of action. A survey was designed to measure public perceptions, knowledge of, and attitudes towards AIS, as well as public support for various management actions. Surveys were administered during the summer of 2013 at two boat launches where one launch had active outreach the previous summer and one that did not. A total of 400 surveys were completed with a response rate of 89%. There was support for most proposed management options, and respondents understood the urgency of managing AIS. There was a difference between the launches in how people responded, highlighting that educational programming may need to be tailored for specific recreational uses and recreational settings.

Keywords: Recreation, aquatic invasive species, education, management

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2016.1174983

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Neoliberal and disciplinary environmentality and ‘sustainable seafood’ consumption: storying environmentally responsible action

Neoliberal and disciplinary environmentality and ‘sustainable seafood’ consumption: storying environmentally responsible action

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Teresa Lloro-Bidart

Pages: 1182-1199 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2015.1105198

Abstract

This article invokes a neoliberal and disciplinary governmentality lens in a political ecology of education framework to analyze educational programming at Long Beach, California’s Aquarium of the Pacific. I begin by briefly describing governmentality as Foucault and neo-Foucauldian scholars have theorized the concept, followed by a discussion of the emergence of green governmentality and environmentality in political ecology. Next, I invoke a political ecology of education framework informed by neoliberal and disciplinary environmentality to analyze institutional and teaching practice at the Aquarium. In this analysis, I demonstrate how the institution’s funding structure, placement within the entertainment markets of the southern California area, and commitment to ocean conservation education all influence how the Aquarium conceptualizes itself and its work. I focus on the case of the Blue Cavern Show and the Seafood for the Future program, which work in tandem to define a problem (declining fish stocks; possible seafood shortages) and then structure a neoliberal solution through the market (sustainable seafood consumption). I conclude by discussing the implications of this research for environmental education, which include unpacking how neoliberalism impacts teaching practice, especially as it relates to notions of framing environmentally responsible action.

Keywords: informal education, neoliberalism, political ecology, zoos

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2015.1105198

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Urban park design + love for nature: Interventions for visitor experiences and social networking

Urban park design + love for nature: Interventions for visitor experiences and social networking

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Eli Typhina

Pages: 1169-1181 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1214863

Abstract

Affect or emotion for nature can prime environmentally friendly attitudes and behaviors, but for one’s love of nature to grow she must physically experience and communicate about nature with others. This study aimed to identify urban park designs that could increase affect for nature in park visitors by stimulating their desire to communicate about and experience nature. Participants included 33 visitors at four urban parks in a mid-sized US city who were interviewed on location. Social network theory (SNT) served as the methodological framework for interpreting why, how, and with whom visitors’ communicated their nature experiences, as well as the design elements that led to increased love for nature. Analysis of the interviews confirmed findings from similar studies, while contributing new insight to how visitors’ use mobile technology to communicate about nature and build bonds with their social network. The conclusion offers ways for scholars and practitioners to improve urban park design so as to increase visitors’ affect, communication about, and action for nature.

Keywords: Pro-environmental behavior, urban park design, social network theory, affect, communication

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2016.1214863

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Young primary students making sense of text and illustrations about how refuse can become soil

Young primary students making sense of text and illustrations about how refuse can become soil

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Lisbeth Åberg-Bengtsson, Dennis Beach & Agneta Ljung-Djärf

Pages: 1150-1168 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2015.1118750

Abstract

Explanatory pictures and models are frequently used in teaching and learning situations. However, it seems to be simply assumed that they are always beneficial. In this article results from an investigation with 16 Swedish pupils aged 7–9 year are presented based on an analysis that has examined how well this assumption holds up. Concepts from multi-modal theory have been used to investigate how young learners deal with illustrations and text from an early reader booklet about composting domestic refuse. The analysis suggests that expectations that illustrations facilitate the meaning-making of young pupils may be exaggerated. Although the booklet claimed to provide interactive support between image and text most of the examples show pupils ignoring pictures or misinterpreting vital information about composting in both the verbal and non-verbal material. The illustrations did not compensate for the most crucial deficiencies in the written text.

Keywords: environmental education, illustrations as support to text, making of meaning composting refuse, young primary students

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2015.1118750

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An interdisciplinary approach to environmental and sustainability education: developing geography students’ understandings of sustainable development using poetry

An interdisciplinary approach to environmental and sustainability education: developing geography students’ understandings of sustainable development using poetry

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Nicola Walshe

Pages: 1130-1149 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1221887

Abstract

Education for sustainable development (ESD) persists as an important concept within international policy and yet, despite considerable debate, there remains a lack of consensus as to a pedagogy for ESD in schools. This paper presents findings from a study investigating how an interdisciplinary approach to ESD in England developed one class of 16- and 17-year-old geography students’ understandings of sustainability. The research used students’ drawings of sustainable cities alongside questionnaires and semi-structured interviews to explore their understanding of sustainable development within a constructivist, case study framework. The study found that the use of poetry within a geography lesson developed students’ appreciation of the social and economic dimensions of sustainability, although their focus persisted around the environmental. As such, it is argued that an interdisciplinary approach to ESD encourages students to engage more critically and affectively with the concept of sustainable development, thereby developing a more holistic appreciation of it.

Keywords: Sustainable development, education for sustainable development (ESD), interdisciplinary, drawings, geography

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2016.1221887

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Compelling evidence: an influence on middle school students’ accounts that may impact decision-making about socioscientific issues

Compelling evidence: an influence on middle school students’ accounts that may impact decision-making about socioscientific issues

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Katherine Emery, Danielle Harlow, Ali Whitmer & Steven Gaines

Pages: 1115-1129 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1225673

Abstract

This study investigates how middle school students make hypothetical purchasing, consuming, and voting decisions about environmental and science-related issues – a key component of environmental literacy. Fifty-three female students were given a packet containing multiple excerpts of information from conflicting positions from stakeholders and interviewed about how they would make decisions about environmental and science-related issues. We first investigated whether and how information presented as evidence influenced students’ accounts that may impact their decision-making (i.e. to make or change decisions). We then investigated how evidence type affected students’ decision-making. Findings indicated that most students did not change their stance after reading additional contrasting information presented as evidence. Implications for science teaching and learning are discussed.

Keywords: Environmental education, decision-making, environmental issues

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2016.1225673

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Greek primary school children’s representations of the urban environment as seen through their drawings

Greek primary school children’s representations of the urban environment as seen through their drawings

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Dimitrios Stokas, Elena Strezou, George Malandrakis & Penelope Papadopoulou

Pages: 1088-1114 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1219316

Abstract

In the present study, we explore aspects of Greek primary school children’s representations about the urban environment through the use of drawings and their relation to sustainability. For that purpose, 104 children, aged 9–12 (4th and 6th grades), were asked to make two drawings of their town: one as it is now and another as they would like it to be. Drawings were analysed using pre-defined categories of urban sustainability and were statistically analysed using SPSS. Results revealed a serious gap in knowledge regarding energy and aspects of local development tied to sustainability in the current and future state of the children’s towns. Although the most popular characteristics in the children’s drawings were associated with the environment, the majority of children illustrated issues related to society. Evidence indicated an age-related progression of representations related to sustainability in the urban environment, at least concerning the topics of natural environment, infrastructure and the realization of problems caused by air pollution and municipal waste generation.

Keywords: Children, urban environment, sustainability, representations, drawings

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2016.1219316

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