Energy literacy of vocational students in Taiwan

Energy literacy of vocational students in Taiwan

  • article in the current issue

Lung-Sheng Lee, Liang-Te Chang, Chih-Chien Lai, Yunn-Horng Guu & Kuen-Yi Lin

Pages: 855-873 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2015.1068276

Abstract

In this study, we administered a questionnaire to 1001 vocational high school students to ascertain their literacy with regard to energy saving and carbon-emissions reduction (ESCER) and to analyze whether their literacy was affected by their gender or academic major. The data analysis produced the following conclusions: (1) behaviors pertaining to ESCER among vocational high school students should be enhanced by promoting appropriate affect rather than solely by conveying knowledge; (2) female students displayed superior knowledge and affect regarding ESCER compared with male students; and (3) students majoring in agriculture performed better than other students in terms of knowledge, affect, and behavioral aspects related to ESCER. The execution and results of this study can serve as a reference for courses or education related to this topic targeting vocational high school students to promote literacy for ESCER, thereby increasing students’ effectiveness in related issues in Taiwan.

Keywords: affect, behavior, carbon saving, energy literacy, knowledge

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2015.1068276

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Energy literacy and agency of New Zealand children

Energy literacy and agency of New Zealand children

  • article in the current issue

I. Aguirre-Bielschowsky, R. Lawson, J. Stephenson & S. Todd

Pages: 832-854 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2015.1054267

Abstract

The development of energy literacy (knowledge, attitudes, and intended behaviour) and agency of New Zealand children (age 9–10) were investigated through thematic and exploratory statistical analyses of interviews (October 2011–April 2012) with 26 children, their parents and teachers, focus groups and photo elicitation. The children knew that electricity costs money and saw it as a finite resource. Half could name an energy source but few knew of any associated environmental issues. Most of the children had a positive attitude towards saving electricity, but did not intend to save energy to a further extent (low intended behaviour) and were not influencing their families to conserve energy (low agency). The children were learning about energy informally from a variety of sources, and acquired their attitudes mostly from talking to their parents. The results highlight the need for energy education for citizenship at school and conversations about energy both there and at home.

Keywords: energy literacy, children, electricity, energy knowledge, attitudes, agency

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2015.1054267

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The interactive effect of pro-environmental disciplinary concentration under cooperation versus competition contexts

The interactive effect of pro-environmental disciplinary concentration under cooperation versus competition contexts

  • article in the current issue

Esther Cuadrado, Carmen Tabernero, RocíoGarcía & BárbaraLuque

Pages: 797-811 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2015.1095860

Abstract

This research explores the relevance of cooperation and students’ environmental disciplinary concentration on decision-making with respect to environmental issues – specifically the use of water, a limited common-pool resource. For this purpose, 61 environmental sciences students and 46 educational sciences students played the role of farmers and made decisions about irrigating their fields in the simulation ‘Irrigania.’ Prior to the simulation exercise, participants were randomly assigned to an experimental condition (competition or cooperation). Results demonstrated that both a cooperation situation and students’ environmental disciplinary concentration are related to the use of more pro-environmental and less selfish irrigation strategies in the simulation. Moreover, high levels of cooperation were able to counteract the lack of students’ disciplinary concentration on environmental problems; inversely, high levels of disciplinary concentration on environmental problems were able to counteract the competitive situations. This study highlights the relevance of programs that provide learning of (1) cooperative contexts that may reinforce cooperative frameworks on which students could base their behaviors, and (2) broader disciplinary concentration related to environmental problems that could lead to students feeling powerful in respect of knowing how to act against those problems and, thus, behaving in less selfish ways, with positive implications for the planet.

Keywords: water, simulation, pro-environmental disciplinary concentration, competition/cooperation, interaction

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2015.1095860

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Start the week with the current issue of the journal

Environmental Education Research, Volume 23, Issue 6, July 2017 is now available online on Taylor & Francis Online.

http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/ceer20/23/6

This new issue contains the following articles:

Education for sustainable agriculture: a typology of the role of teaching farms in achieving learning goals and objectives

Kelly Monaghan, Marilyn Swisher, Rosalie L. Koenig & Juan C. Rodriguez

Pages: 749-772 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2015.1091877

“Women and the environmental are together”: using Participatory Rural Appraisal to examine gendered tensions about the environment

Cassie F. Quigley, S. Megan Che, Stella Achieng & Sarah Liaram

Pages: 773-796 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1169511

The interactive effect of pro-environmental disciplinary concentration under cooperation versus competition contexts

Esther Cuadrado, Carmen Tabernero, Rocío García & Bárbara Luque

Pages: 797-811 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2015.1095860

Using action research to enhance learning on end-use energy demand: lessons from reflective practice

Saska Petrova, Miguel Torres Garcia & Stefan Bouzarovski

Pages: 812-831 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1144177

Energy literacy and agency of New Zealand children

I. Aguirre-Bielschowsky, R. Lawson, J. Stephenson & S. Todd

Pages: 832-854 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2015.1054267

Energy literacy of vocational students in Taiwan

Lung-Sheng Lee, Liang-Te Chang, Chih-Chien Lai, Yunn-Horng Guu & Kuen-Yi Lin

Pages: 855-873 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2015.1068276

Potential for knowledge in action? An analysis of Korean green energy related K3–12 curriculum and texts

Douglas R. Gress & Jungyeop Shin

Pages: 874-885 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1204987

Effects of locus of control on behavioral intention and learning performance of energy knowledge in game-based learning

Jie Chi Yang, Yi Lung Lin & Yi-Chun Liu

Pages: 886-899 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1214865

Spillover effects in environmental behaviors, across time and context: a review and research agenda

Spillover effects in environmental behaviors, across time and context: a review and research agenda

  • paper in the current issue

Andreas Nilsson, Magnus Bergquist & Wesley P. Schultz

Pages: 573-589 | DOI:

Abstract

When implementing environmental education and interventions to promote one pro-environmental behavior, it is seldom asked if and how non-target pro-environmental behaviors are affected. The spillover effect proposes that engaging in one behavior affects the probability of engagement or disengaging in a second behavior. Therefore, the positive spillover effect predicts that interventions targeting one specific behavioral have the capacity to promote non-targeted and/or future pro-environmental behaviors. However, the negative spillover effect predicts that engaging in a first pro-environmental behavior will prevent or decrease a second pro-environmental behavior. Since the theoretical and empirical basis for positive and negative spillover effects are not sufficiently understood, the present paper (1) suggests a distinction between behavioral, temporal, and contextual spillovers (2) reviews the existing spillover research literature across a variety of environmental domains, (3) presents potential moderators governing the direction of spillover effects, and finally (4) discuss techniques to promote pro-environmental spillovers.

Keywords: Environmental behaviors, spillover, rebound, moral-licensing

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2016.1250148

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Immigrant children promoting environmental care: enhancing learning, agency and integration through culturally-responsive environmental education

Immigrant children promoting environmental care: enhancing learning, agency and integration through culturally-responsive environmental education

  • paper in the current issue

Natasha Blanchet-Cohen & Rosemary C. Reilly

Pages: 553-572 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1153046

Abstract

This paper examines the potential of culturally-responsive environmental education to engage immigrant early adolescents. Our study suggests that environmental involvement can become a means and an end for children to bridge their school and home in agential ways. Drawing from a multi-phase study involving focus groups with children, parents, and teachers from three culturally-diverse schools in Montreal, as well as a green action research project, we examine children’s role as environmental educators and ambassadors. The role of environmental ambassador allowed children to take on positions that departed from conventional parent-child social scripts, and enhanced the communication between school-student-home, between generations, and spoke to their sense of place. We contend that culturally-responsive environmental education offers a unique space for enacting democracy, knowledge creation and integration, but this opportunity is often squandered. Bi-directional, responsive, and consistent home-school-community-place relations need to be actively supported.

Keywords: environmental education, immigrant children, learning, culturally-responsive, agency, intergenerational

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2016.1153046

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The autonomy-authority duality of shared decision-making in youth environmental action

The autonomy-authority duality of shared decision-making in youth environmental action

  • paper in the current issue

Tania M. Schusler, Marianne E. Krasny & Daniel J. Decker

Pages: 533-552 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1144174

Abstract

While environmental action is recognized as an effective approach for developing young people’s capabilities as citizens and contributing to environmental improvements, little research has addressed how adults facilitate youth action projects. Environmental action involves a partnership among youth and adults characterized by shared decision-making. We sought insights into the adult experience of shared decision-making through phenomenological interviews with 33 educators facilitating youth environmental action in various non-formal and formal settings in the USA. Educators described experiencing tensions in sharing decision-making power, which we conceive of as a duality – two inseparable elements both contradictory and complementary that drive the dynamics of a system. The duality consists of youth autonomy and adult authority, which stems not only from formally vested decision-making power but also adults’ experience and wisdom. Educators navigated this duality through diverse approaches to structuring youth participation, supporting youth, valuing mutual learning, and communicating transparently to develop equitable relationships.

Keywords: environmental action, youth participation, shared decision-making, educator practice, autonomy–authority duality

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2016.1144174

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