Good news Friday – the numbers are in, and now out!

We are delighted to report an increase on 2015’s Impact Factor for Environmental Education Research, a healthy rise from 1.374 to 1.709.
 
While the ranking is the same as last year (51/230), a glance over recent years will show the journal continues to hover around the top 50 mark in the JCR rankings for Education & Educational Research. That the IF has had to increase substantially to maintain a solid result in Q1 is fine testament to two things:
– the interest, support and citations of work in Environmental Education Research offered by the research community in Education & Educational Research, as well as our other subject category, Environmental Studies
– no loss of momentum in that, even though we are now publishing 2 more issues per year than for 2015.
On behalf of the editorial board and publishing team, I’d like to express our appreciation to the authors, referees, reviewers, copy editors and readers of the work in the journal that leads to such scores. We wouldn’t be there without you!
 
So perhaps we can all have a weekend off to celebrate! 😉

Starting the week with a “Thank you”

As the editor of Environmental Education Research, it is simply delightful to get to work with Alex Lazzari from our publishers, Taylor & Francis. In this instance, it was over one of those long lunches were we get to discuss all things “journal” – the ups and downs of the industry, trends and new horizons in the field, if not how to stay sane and smiling amid all the messiness that comes with the lives and livelihoods we seek to value …

Alex offers stellar support and wisdom to the editorial office, something we’ve been privileged to experience from day 1 with another of our champions at T&F, Ian White.

By the end of last Friday’s meeting, the notepad was full of wonderful ideas and initiatives addressing what we could do over the next few years with the journal. We’ll be sifting and sharpening those within the editorial board in the coming months, and announcing those on this page amongst other places – but a milestone we especially look forward is reaching 25 years with the volume after next.

And to have that in sight, I can but pass on Alex’s and my thanks to the editorial board, office, authors and referees who have made that so very possible!

We salute you, and look forward to raising another glass!

Tips on Thursdays – Search Engine Optimalisation

Behaviour, behavior? ESD, EfS, EESD? Ecopedagogy, eco-pedagogy, eco pedagogy?

How smart are search engines? And, how smart are the people who feed stuff into search engines to chew on?

If you want clues on how best to optimise / optimalize the discoverability of your work, read this handy guide from our publishers …

http://authorservices.taylorandfrancis.com/a-researchers-guide-to-seo/

http://ow.ly/d/62ZM

“Critical Investigations of the Research-Policy Relationship in Environmental and Sustainability Education”

The latest call for proposals for the journal:

“Critical Investigations of the Research-Policy Relationship in Environmental and Sustainability Education”

Guest editors: Mark Rickinson, Monash University & Marcia McKenzie, University of Saskatchewan

The purpose of this Special Issue is to draw and build upon:

• the growing interest in policy and policy research within the environmental and sustainability education (ESE) research field;

• the increasing body of work on the research-policy relationship in fields beyond ESE;

• the need to bring these two developments into conversation and debate, against the backdrop of developments in monitoring and evaluation aims in international ESE policy.

Key date for CFP, Proposal Guidelines and Submission Timeline – May 15, 2017

Full details in the attachment.

http://ow.ly/d/5VMY

 

Environmental Education Research in 2017

Dear Colleagues

In this start of year message, we provide a few further updates on the journal from 2016, and going into 2017:

About the Journal

Over the last few years, the journal has made good use of social media to keep readers and contributors abreast of the work in this field. If this is your thing too, you can find us via #eerjournal, @eerjournal, bit.do/eerjournal and fb.com/eerjournal.

Please note we also invite authors to submit social media ready material with their manuscripts, e.g. to share via the publisher’s social media and other media tools. Other innovations in this online space include the possibility of video abstracts. Details via the above links, and at bit.do/eermedia.

To find out more about the journal’s board structure, reviewer guidance, and the various purposes and formats for manuscripts that can be submitted to the journal, please visit bit.do/abouteer. These are reviewed every 3 years; if you have any feedback on the latest versions, please direct that to the editorial office in the first instance.

Journal measures

The Journal’s Impact Factor rose again in 2016, to 1.374, as did the SNIP, to 1.692. This keeps the journal firmly in the top quarter (Q1) of ISI journals in Education and Education Research, and actually, near to the top 10% of the CiteScore ranking in Education. Information about which articles are being read, and those which are cited that lead to such outcomes, can be found at bit.do/eermostread and bit.do/eermostcited.

As we’ve noted before, perhaps it is little surprise that the highest impacts and rankings in education and education research continue to come from publishing “critical, integrative reviews of research literature bearing on education, including conceptualizations, interpretations, and syntheses of literature and scholarly work in a field broadly relevant to education and educational research.” {http://rer.sagepub.com/}

Issues, special issues, and virtual special issues

2017 will see the journal grow again to 10 issues a year. While online publication following acceptance, copy editing and formatting is usually very rapid, this ‘growth’ will again help us clear the considerable backlog of articles waiting to print in hard copy as well as create more space for special issues. (For the latest standard articles, see bit.do/eerlatest, while for general notes about SIs, see bit.do/eersi)

2017 brings the publication of a special issue on examples, trends and challenges for environmental education and its research in Brazil, and we hope, some of those from recent calls for papers, e.g. related to botanic gardens, early childhood education, and studies in the Benelux region. As usual, our thanks go to the guest editors of these special issues for their work and leadership in pulling together these contributions to the field, and those working on the next clutch of SIs.

Refereeing

The editorial office now receives a submission equating to at least one paper every day of the working week. Time from submission to first decision has also dropped, last year it was to around 33 days (i.e. 5-6 weeks) – our particular thanks go to the editorial board and referees for enabling this to happen, as well as to those authors who have responded to the requests for feedback on the ‘quality of experience’ with the journal, which also shows marked improvement.

Regarding submissions, please note we continue to screen submissions so as not to bog down board members and referees with unnecessary or unsatisfying work. At risk of repeating the usual nostrums, problems with (a) addressing the aims and scope of the journal, (b) showing familiarity with both the literature and the trends and issues of the field, and crucially how a paper advances on those (e.g. theoretically, empirically, methodologically, etc.), and (c) the manuscript’s readiness for review (including using journal templates and being carefully proof read prior to submission), are the most typical reasons papers have struggled in the refereeing process.

Please also note that most articles typically requiring 2-3 rounds of reviewing as a minimum, sometimes less if good use is made of feedback from colleagues before submission or re-review, and professional editing services (such as those provided by the publisher, https://www.tandfeditingservices.com/en/). As ever we remain indebted to referees and the editorial board for sustaining such a high level of professional service and collegiality in responding to the requests of the editorial office.

Preparing for 2017

Each year, mindful of the need to reduce the volume of work and service refereeing involves, we strongly encourage authors to submit the best paper they can, consulting the guidance on the website, recently published articles and their critical friends before submitting, while in relation to requests for revisions, we particularly welcome concise and collegial commentaries on changes made to articles when resubmitting. For further advice, see http://authorservices.taylorandfrancis.com/category/writing-your-paper/

As 2017 gets underway, we are also always grateful if records are updated as to your usual and evolving areas of interest, alongside any changes in contact details, affiliations and emails, alongside availability to act as a reviewer during the coming twelve months. Please log in via http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ceer to make these changes. We invite particular attention to the accuracy and scope of keywords indicating your expertise and interests, as these are relied upon in the reviewer selection process.

Should you feel unable to continue as an active member of the refereeing pool, please delete your account or contact the editorial office via eer@monash.edu. In general, Claire Drake is the primary point of contact for the editorial office, via eer@monash.edu.

One final point for the first half of 2017, Alan will be on sabbatical, so some of the chief editing duties will be shared with one of our associate editors, Justin Dillon. Alan and Justin have recently completed editing the Major Works of Environmental Education (bit.do/eemajorworks), something else you might want to dip into in 2017 …

Finally, we always look forward to receiving submissions in line with the aims and scope of the journal, including in the newer formats. As a reminder, details can be found at http://www.tandfonline.com/EER and bit.do/abouteer

On behalf of the editorial board, we thank you once again for your continuing support and contributions to the journal, and to end on a personal note, we wish you a very happy and productive New Year.

All good wishes,

Alan & Claire

Editorial Office, Environmental Education Research

Gentle reminder that “a social networking site is not an open access repository”

Authors with this journal are strongly encouraged to use and share their work in line with their particular publishing agreement, e.g. standard (such as via eprints and institutional repositories) or open access routes.

However, using some of the widely available commercial enterprises will often violate copyright automatically, particularly if a full text pdf of one of our journal articles [“Version of Record”, VoR] is posted. Such “services” or networks are not always operating with an author’s or this journal’s best interests to the fore; for one of the many discussions on that, see:

http://osc.universityofcalifornia.edu/2015/12/a-social-networking-site-is-not-an-open-access-repository/

For existing and potential authors, you might want to check the terms and conditions and wider points made at:
http://authorservices.taylorandfrancis.com/sharing-your-work/

While should you fancy tidying up after yourself, removing or updating what has perhaps been inadvertently made available on Researchgate or Academia.edu from this journal before, the universe is sure to smile at you – if not the Editor and publishers of Environmental Education Research.

Start the week by considering the key decision categories on manuscripts

After pre-screening of submissions against the aims and scope of the journal, referees and editors are invited to assess the quality of a manuscript. But what are the key recommendation options available to referees and the editorial board?

The recommendation that goes with the qualitative comments about the originality, presentation, relevance, and significance of the manuscript’s subject matter to the readership of the journal is usually one from a range of standard types.

The key decisions are:
Accept – if the paper is suitable for publication in its current form.*
Minor revision – if the paper will be ready for publication after light revisions.
Major revision – if the paper would benefit from substantial changes such as expanded data analysis, widening of the literature review, or rewriting sections of the text.
Reject – if the paper is not suitable for publication with this journal, or if the revisions that would need to be undertaken are too fundamental for the submission to continue being considered in its current form.

Please note that with ‘major revisions’, the editor is usually expecting something more substantial than a long series of minor revisions; in other words, the quality of the manuscript should be substantially improved and demonstrably so on resubmission, e.g. as explained in the cover letter.

This year, the average time to decision based on refereeing has been 33 days. On average, authors may expect 2-3 rounds of refereeing before a paper is accepted, hopefully moving up the ladder of decisions with each round.

NB In the last ten years, of other 1000 submissions, only two papers have been accepted at this journal without any revisions required.

  • Some articles receive a ‘provisional accept‘, e.g. the title, keywords, abstract, or copy editing may also need attending to given the evolution of the manuscript since the original submission, but another round of refereeing is not required. It is not the job of the reviewer to edit the paper for English, but referees may suggest corrections to the English where the technical meaning is unclear. For non-native speakers, our publishers, Taylor & Francis, offers English language editing services – http://www.tandfeditingservices.com/en/