Fostering changes in attitude, knowledge and behavior: demographic variation in environmental education effects

Fostering changes in attitude, knowledge and behavior: demographic variation in environmental education effects

  • New EER Article Alert

Tina Braun, Richard Cottrell & Paul Dierkes

Pages: 1-22 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2017.1343279

Abstract

This study employs a uniquely multi-factorial, large-scale design to investigate baseline differences and the effects of a singular outdoor educational program on environmental attitudes, knowledge and behavior among primary and secondary school students educated in four different countries. Statistical modelling approaches employed country of residence, age, nationality, sampling year, gender and urban/ rural habitation as predictor variables. Baseline scores were explained by a number of predictors but country of residence and rural-urban differences appeared as the most consistent explanatory variable for positive changes in attitude, knowledge and behavior. Given the nexus of political, social, natural and cultural data contained within the residence variable, we discuss the complex web of drivers that may influence environmental literacy and environmentally responsible behavior. Spatial variation in the value of outdoor education programs is also discussed.

Keywords: Outdoor education, environmental knowledge, pro-environmental behavior, environmental attitude, geographic specificity

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2017.1343279

#newEERpaper

Advertisements

Greek primary school children’s representations of the urban environment as seen through their drawings

Greek primary school children’s representations of the urban environment as seen through their drawings

  • article in current issue

Dimitrios Stokas, Elena Strezou, George Malandrakis & Penelope Papadopoulou

Pages: 1088-1114 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1219316

Abstract

In the present study, we explore aspects of Greek primary school children’s representations about the urban environment through the use of drawings and their relation to sustainability. For that purpose, 104 children, aged 9–12 (4th and 6th grades), were asked to make two drawings of their town: one as it is now and another as they would like it to be. Drawings were analysed using pre-defined categories of urban sustainability and were statistically analysed using SPSS. Results revealed a serious gap in knowledge regarding energy and aspects of local development tied to sustainability in the current and future state of the children’s towns. Although the most popular characteristics in the children’s drawings were associated with the environment, the majority of children illustrated issues related to society. Evidence indicated an age-related progression of representations related to sustainability in the urban environment, at least concerning the topics of natural environment, infrastructure and the realization of problems caused by air pollution and municipal waste generation.

Keywords: Children, urban environment, sustainability, representations, drawings

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2016.1219316

#EERcurrentissue

The effects of socio-scientific issue based inquiry learning on pupils’ representations of landscape

The effects of socio-scientific issue based inquiry learning on pupils’ representations of landscape

  • article in the current issue

Sirpa Kärkkäinen, Tuula Keinonen, Jari Kukkonen, Seija Juntunen & Ilkka Ratinen

Pages: 1072-1087 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1177711

Abstract

Research has demonstrated that socio-scientific issues based inquiry learning has significant advantages for learning outcomes and students’ motivation. Further, a successful understanding of landscapes in environmental and geographical education can be achieved by combining informal learning environments with school education. Therefore this case study focuses on how socio-scientific issues based inquiry learning carried out in school and in a Nature Park, influences primary school pupils’ (n = 36) representations of landscapes. The pupils were asked to draw and write about landscape both before and after intervention. The data was analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively to investigate the impact of the intervention on the representations that pupils used in their descriptions of landscape. It was found that socio-scientific issues based inquiry learning in varied learning environments, noticeably enriched the pupil’s representations and lead to a multifaceted holistic understanding of landscape. Many of the representations produced were considered to be fairly sophisticated.

Keywords: Environmental education, geography education, landscape, socio-scientific issues

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2016.1177711

#EERcurrentissue

Amplifying John Muir’s life: a third sector intervention in providing alternative narrative resources to secondary schools

Amplifying John Muir’s life: a third sector intervention in providing alternative narrative resources to secondary schools

  • New EER Article Alert

Alette Willis & Franziska Schmidt

Pages: 1-12 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2017.1344192

Abstract

In 2014, Scottish Book Trust (SBT) published and distributed classroom sets of a graphic novel about the life of pioneering environmental activist John Muir to all secondary schools in Scotland, where he is still relatively unknown. This paper outlines the collaborative process SBT used in producing the graphic novel and sets out to trace the impact of this intervention through teacher and pupil surveys. The former survey reveals that not all teachers were able to make use of the classroom sets but that those who did found it useful in bringing up environmental issues in a range of disciplinary and cross-disciplinary contexts. The book served as a narrative resource for some teachers in designing lesson plans and even in designing entire courses. The pupil survey found significant mean shifts in the New Environmental Paradigm Scale for Children and the Inclusion of Nature in Self Scale in participating classes and across all classes. Building on insights from narrative therapy and narrative ethics, we argue that shifting attitudes and values requires new narratives alongside new experiences and the space in which to dialogue about the two in community. Further research into reading and environmental education is advocated.

Keywords: Reading, environmental attitudes, values, narrative ethics, John Muir, graphic novel

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2017.1344192

Young children’s ideas about environment: perspectives from three early childhood educational settings

Young children’s ideas about environment: perspectives from three early childhood educational settings

  • article in the current issue

Lauren Madden & Jennifer Liang

Pages: 1055-1071 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1236185

Abstract

Many efforts have been made around the globe to advocate for and encourage environmental sustainability education (ESE). As many as 15 fields can serve as ‘currents’ on the greater field of environmental education, including environmental education and education for sustainability. We acknowledge that each is a separate and distinct field of inquiry, but choose not to limit our perspective to any one field or the other. Thus, we have elected to use the term ESE to refer to work that falls into any or all of these categories throughout this manuscript for learners of all ages. Yet, there is a dearth of information at the early childhood level, defined as toddlers through eight-year-olds. Our exploratory study focused on better describing young children’s understandings of ESE. Young children (ages three-eight) from three different suburban early childhood education settings (public school pre-kindergarten, church-based cooperative preschool, and private daycare center) participated in focus group interviews before and one week after a brief ESE learning activity. Findings revealed that children were able to describe nature in more sophisticated ways after the intervention than before, suggesting that learning in early childhood ESE is possible and fruitful.

Keywords: Early childhood, environmental education, conceptions

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2016.1236185

#EERcurrentissue

The philosophies, contents and pedagogies of environmental education programs in 10 Israeli elementary schools

The philosophies, contents and pedagogies of environmental education programs in 10 Israeli elementary schools

  • article in current issue

Tali Tal & Einat Peled

Pages: 1032-1053 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1153047

Abstract

In this study, our aim was to understand how environmental education has been implemented in Israeli elementary schools. We selected ten schools that had implemented Education for Sustainability programs and analyzed their mission statements and curriculum documents. We observed each school’s activities and interviewed teachers. Our analysis shows ambiguity with respect to the rationales and the theoretical foundations of the programs. It also shows much didactic teaching of content, a strong focus on behavioral outcomes, especially with respect to reducing resource consumption and to increasing the levels of recycling, as well as some degree of working with the community. The unclear status of environmental education in Israel, in terms of its structure within the education system, prevents it from having sufficient resources for teacher education and curriculum development. It is suggested that this lack of clarity is the main cause of the ambiguity and for the use of the traditional pedagogies we found in our analysis.

Keywords: curriculum, education for sustainable development, environmental education, professional development, Elementary schools

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2016.1153047

#EERcurrentissue

Start the week with the current issue of the journal

Environmental Education Research, Volume 23, Issue 8, September 2017 is now available online on Taylor & Francis Online.

http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/ceer20/23/8

 

This new issue contains the following articles:

Young children’s ideas about environment: perspectives from three early childhood educational settings

Lauren Madden & Jennifer Liang

Pages: 1055-1071 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1236185

 

The effects of socio-scientific issue based inquiry learning on pupils’ representations of landscape

Sirpa Kärkkäinen, Tuula Keinonen, Jari Kukkonen, Seija Juntunen & Ilkka Ratinen

Pages: 1072-1087 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1177711

 

Greek primary school children’s representations of the urban environment as seen through their drawings

Dimitrios Stokas, Elena Strezou, George Malandrakis & Penelope Papadopoulou

Pages: 1088-1114 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1219316

 

Compelling evidence: an influence on middle school students’ accounts that may impact decision-making about socioscientific issues

Katherine Emery, Danielle Harlow, Ali Whitmer & Steven Gaines

Pages: 1115-1129 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1225673

 

An interdisciplinary approach to environmental and sustainability education: developing geography students’ understandings of sustainable development using poetry

Nicola Walshe

Pages: 1130-1149 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1221887

 

Young primary students making sense of text and illustrations about how refuse can become soil

Lisbeth Åberg-Bengtsson, Dennis Beach & Agneta Ljung-Djärf

Pages: 1150-1168 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2015.1118750

 

Urban park design + love for nature: Interventions for visitor experiences and social networking

Eli Typhina

Pages: 1169-1181 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1214863

 

Neoliberal and disciplinary environmentality and ‘sustainable seafood’ consumption: storying environmentally responsible action

Teresa Lloro-Bidart

Pages: 1182-1199 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2015.1105198

 

The impact of on-site educational outreach on recreational users’ perceptions of aquatic invasive species and their management

Ryan L. Sharp, Lisa B. Cleckner & Sarah DePillo

Pages: 1200-1210 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1174983