Collective Impact on the Ground

Start the week by considering the collective impact of environmental education initiatives

In this new article published in the Stanford Social Innovation Review, the journal’s Associate Editor, Nicole Ardoin and colleagues explore “what might be possible if organisations worked together to increase the impact of environmental education”.

The article sketches the roles and challenges of ensuring a commitment to equity, a common agenda, shared measurement systems, mutually reinforcing activities, continuous communication, and a backbone support organization.

— You might also be wondering what this raises for environmental education research too (and not just in California). For starters, how to foster (or impede?) collaborative processes, and what kinds of collective impact are desired and desirable for whom, where and when – and of course, why …?

An in-depth look at an environmental education collaborative during the early stages of its collective impact process.

In early 2013, funders, environmental educators, and researchers crowded elbow-to-elbow around a 20-year-old redwood forest shelf fungus. On the 23rd-floor conference room of a San Francisco skyscraper, a skilled educator engaged the group in conversation around this object. Hushed tones filled the room, punctuated by the easy laughter and engaged questions one would expect from a collegial group.

Yet, the group hadn’t always looked this way. Just a year and a half earlier, members of the group sat stiffly in office chairs as they wrestled with an exciting, yet daunting, question: What might be possible if their organizations worked together to increase the impact of environmental education across the San Francisco and Monterey Bay regions?”

Read on at the link: Collective Impact on the Ground | Stanford Social Innovation Review

http://ow.ly/5LUx30bN9Xe

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