Development and validation of two scales to measure elaboration and behaviors associated with stewardship in children

Development and validation of two scales to measure elaboration and behaviors associated with stewardship in children

  • paper in current issue

Susan Lynn Vezeau, Robert B. Powell, Marc J. Stern, D. DeWayne Moore & Brett A. Wright

Pages: 192-213 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2015.1121377

Abstract

This investigation examines the development of two scales that measure elaboration and behaviors associated with stewardship in children. The scales were developed using confirmatory factor analysis to investigate their construct validity, reliability, and psychometric properties. Results suggest that a second-order factor model structure provides the best fit. This model produced: (1) a stewardship elaboration scale measuring interest and cognitive engagement in stewardship issues, and (2) a stewardship behavior scale measuring in-park, community, and home behaviors. These scales will be useful for evaluating environmental educational programs focused on environmental and park stewardship. The scales may also help researchers assess whether environmental education results in participants elaborating on persuasive messaging, thereby increasing the likelihood that behavioral intentions leading to behavior change will occur.

Keywords: confirmatory factor analysis, scale development, elaboration likelihood model, stewardship behavior, environmental education

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2015.1121377

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Start the week by considering: ‘So What?’ … a question that every journal article needs to answer

Does your research article communicate the “what, so what, and now what”? Follow the link to access Neil Selwyn’s thoughts on the central question …

Start the week by considering how you disseminate research

Research dissemination is concerned with making sure your research gets read and applied. The journal publishers recommend working with Kudos, a service free for researchers, that provides a toolkit for explaining your work in plain language and for enriching it with links to related materials.

The toolkit can help with:

  • Explaining in plain language what your publication is about and why it is important. Add links to other materials that provide context.

  • Sharing it to your social networks, web pages or email contacts.

  • Measuring the effect on clicks, views, downloads, citations and altmetrics to learn which communication channels are most effective.

Find out more at the link, and feel free to share your stories of dissemination, and advice, in the comments

Measuring ocean literacy in pre-service teachers: psychometric properties of the Greek version of the Survey of Ocean Literacy and Experience (SOLE)

Measuring ocean literacy in pre-service teachers: psychometric properties of the Greek version of the Survey of Ocean Literacy and Experience (SOLE)

  • paper in current issue

Angelos Markos, Theodora Boubonari, Athanasios Mogias & Theodoros Kevrekidis

Pages: 231-251 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2015.1126807

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to respond to the increasing demand for comprehensive tools for the measurement of ocean literacy, by investigating the psychometric characteristics of a Greek version of the Survey of Ocean Literacy and Experience (SOLE), an instrument that assesses conceptual understanding of general ocean sciences content, focusing on the knowledge component. Four hundred twenty-one pre-service primary school teachers participated in a cross-sectional study. The dichotomous Rasch model was used to examine the measurement properties of the SOLE, namely, person-item targeting and separation, reliability, dimensionality and differential item functioning (DIF). Steps were taken to improve the instrument, where any of these attributes were outside acceptable ranges. Results suggested that a modified SOLE showed an adequate fit to the Rasch model, is unidimensional, free of DIF, and is particularly well-suited to the population under study. Our findings suggest that the SOLE constitutes a valuable tool which can be applied to a different cultural context and population. The proposed use of the instrument could contribute to the assessment of the quality of marine education in school-based and non-formal education contexts and to the cross-cultural comparison of ocean literacy, which are prerequisites for the improvement of ocean literacy.

Keywords: ocean literacy, SOLE, Rasch analysis

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2015.1126807

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Help support Thesis Thursdays

Please visit: http://bit.do/thesis_summary to access the new streamlined template.

If you’ve just finished your doctorate researching EE, or know someone who has, or want others in this research community to know about that, this feature of the journal may be the tool for you …

  • Please note, this is not a dissertation abstract recirculation, as with online commercial or institutional thesis databases – fresh writing, reframing and rejigging are expected as per the guidelines and editing expectations. *

Reflected places of childhood: applying the ideas of humanistic and cultural geographies to environmental education research

Reflected places of childhood: applying the ideas of humanistic and cultural geographies to environmental education research

  • New EER Article Alert

Sirpa Tani

Pages: 1-9 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2016.1269875

Abstract

The article investigates people–environment relationships from the viewpoint of humanistic and cultural geographies and highlights the importance of subjective experiences and emotional place attachment in the construction of environmental attitudes. Some core concepts of these research fields (e.g. ‘place’, ‘insideness/outsideness’, ‘topophilia/topophobia) are defined and their meanings for environmental relations are interpreted. Empirical material is based on the written essays of 65 students who participated in the Introduction Course of Environmental Education at the University of Helsinki, Finland. The analysis concentrated on students’ childhood memories to find out what kind of environmental experiences were regarded as significant from the adults’ perspective. The essays showed how the students’ environmental attitudes were not always based on their experiences of nature but their connection to the environment could also be constructed in urban settings. The role of everyday environments and other people during childhood years were regarded as essential elements in constructing close bonds with the environment.

Keywords: Place, environment, sense of place, humanistic geography, cultural geography

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2016.1269875

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The interplay among environmental attitudes, pro-environmental behavior, social identity, and pro-environmental institutional climate. A longitudinal study

The interplay among environmental attitudes, pro-environmental behavior, social identity, and pro-environmental institutional climate. A longitudinal study

  • paper in the current issue

Gabriele Prati, Cinzia Albanesi & Luca Pietrantoni

Pages: 176-191 | DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2015.1118752

Abstract

By using a panel design in a sample of 298 undergraduate/master students at an Italian public university, the present study aimed to test longitudinally the interplay among environmental attitudes, pro-environmental behavior, social identity, and pro-environmental institutional climate. The relationships were tested with cross-lagged analysis based on two waves over a 2-month period. The cross-lagged panel analysis revealed positive cross-lagged effects of social identity on environmental attitudes and pro-environmental institutional climate perceptions on social identity. Environmental attitudes and social identity at Time 1 did not predict Time 2 pro-environmental behavior. Pro-environmental behavior at Time 1 did not predict Time 2 environmental attitudes. Pro-environmental institutional climate perceptions at Time 1 did not predict Time 2 pro-environmental behavior. Finally, social identity at Time 1 did not predict Time 2 pro-environmental institutional climate perceptions.

Keywords: attitude, pro-environmental behavior, social identity, pro-environmental climate, longitudinal

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2015.1118752

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